2018 Committee Nominees

Kelly Buehler

Jennifer Campion

Rachel Hamilton-Williams

Luqman Hayes

Victoria Leachman

Joel Wirāmu Pauling

Brenda Wallace

 

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Kelly Buehler (current interim committee member)

White woman with glasses and red hair. Aged 40-50

Kelly Buehler. Photo supplied by Kelly Buehler

Hi! My name is Kelly Buehler, and I’m standing for the Tohatoha Commons Board.

As a member of the interim board, I have been able to share my expertise and experience to help set up robust governance with policies that will support Tohatoha Commons into the future. It is exciting work and I’m eager to continue.

As a long-time copyright activist, I believe that New Zealand requires an answer that is not copied from another country, but is inspired by our own legal history as well as Te Tiriti o Waitangi. I believe that Tohatoha Commons can at least bring us closer to that goal.

Professionally, I’ve spent well over 20 years working in strategy, innovation, technology and governance. In addition to a deep awareness of the issues specific to copyright today, my “paper” qualifications include the Institute of Directors’ Strategy and Governance Courses, an MBA from Victoria University, and a qualification in Enterprise Architecture.

 

 

 

 

Jennifer Campion

White woman with long hair wearing a black shirt. Age 30-40

Jennifer Campion. University of Waikato Portrait. Photo provided by Jennifer Campion.

I’m an academic based at Te Piringa-Faculty of Law at the University of Waikato. I have also served as a subject librarian and have chaired the LIANZA Standing Committee on Copyright since 2015.  I was appointed to the Universities New Zealand Copyright Experts Working Group in 2018.
Prior to moving into the tertiary sector, I was employed in legal private practice as a litigation lawyer.
 I’m interested in Tohatoha because I want to see a copyright law that supports the GLAM sector and meets the needs of New Zealanders. I work closely with Mandy to support Tohatoha’s resource development and monitor the copyright reform process.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photograph of a white woman with glasses. Aged 30-40.

Rachel Hamilton-Williams. Photo supplied by Rachel Hamilton-Williams.

 

Rachel Hamilton-Williams (current interim committee Chair)

It’s been a privilege to be part of setting up Tohatoha Aotearoa. I’m the interim chair of the board, and would be happy to continue in that role. I am excited to see the results of all that hard work come to fruition over the next few years.

My background running a web development company writing open source software gives me a broad range of skills, useful to the establishment of our new enterprise. I’m committed to good governance, and supporting our hard working staff.

My interest is in making sure we’re well run, financially sustainable and delivering on our promises and contracts, so that creative commons licenses are understood as credible options by content creators.

 

 

 

Luqman Hayes

I am a big supporter of Tohatoha, its advocacy for growing the Commons and its work educating on open access and copyright. As a librarian based at Auckland University of Technology with a background in journalism and writing I can provide a relevant and informed contribution to furthering the direction and strategy of Tohatoha.

I have expertise in scholarly communications, in particular the development of systems for supporting sustainable and equitable open access to research. My team set up Tuwhera in 2016. We now support eight open access, peer reviewed journals alongside other fully open collections utilising Creative Commons licences for sharing content globally. I have also written and presented on issues of relevance to Tohatoha especially in the New Zealand context in relation to indigeneity and the Māori values which underpin the work we do with Tuwhera.

Having a seat on the committee would enable me to build synergies between the values of Tuwhera and those of Tohatoha. I am actively involved in scholarly communications, research support and open access networks, such as the Australasian Open Access Strategy Group and will use these links to both inform the work I do with Tohatoha and to seek out new collaborations and opportunities of benefit to the work of the organisation and the communities it represents. As a founding member of Tohatoha I am motivated to contribute to growing its influence and impact as a force for critically-informed change and progress within the open movement. I am a critical as well as a creative thinker, qualities which I feel are crucial to helping shape Tohatoha as a dynamic movement supporting knowledge and creativity in Aotearoa.

 

 

Victoria Leachman (current interim committee member)

Victoria Leachman, blond white woman aged 35-45 wearing a black shirt

Victoria Leachman Rights Manager Te Papa, 2015. Photograph by Norm Heke. Te Papa (109824)

I am employed as the Rights Manager at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa (Te Papa) and I live in Wellington. I want all New Zealanders to be knowledgeable about Creative Commons licensing. I want all New Zealanders to be confident in both applying Creative Commons copyright licenses to their own works and confident in using Creative Commons licensed works and understanding the terms of the licensing.

I respect the rights of copyright holders to waive or licence their copyright and associated rights as they see fit. I have contributed my own creative work to the digital Commons using open licensing in platforms such as Flickr and Wikidata, Wikimedia, and Wikipedia. I support making openly licensed works more findable through my volunteer work with crowdsourcing projects such as Biodiversity Heritage Library Flickr project.

I am a strong supporter of the New Zealand Government Open Access and Licensing Framework and the NZ Government’s Open Data programme of work. I  am experienced in governance having been a member of the Creative Commons Aotearoa New Zealand Advisory Panel and having served terms as a board member and vice-chair of the Katherine Mansfield Birthplace Society. The strategic priorities of Tohatoha resonate with me and I have a particular focus on education of creators and users, advocacy of open access, and copyright reform. I believe that my experience will add value to the Committee should I be elected.

 

Joel Wirāmu Pauling 

Photo of white male wearing aviation headphones. Aged 30-40

Joel Wirāmu Pauling. Photo provided by Joel Wirāmu Pauling.

Kia ora tātou/greetings everyone, my name is Joel and I originally come from South/Central Taranaki but have lived in Wellington, Canada and Singapore. I trained as Social Psychologist at Victoria University and did my Masters Thesis on how Knowledge and Creative works are handled and shared within Cultures. Creative Commons and Tohatoha’s goals represent the spirit of that work which now seems like a lifetime ago.

Professionally I have a successful career as a Network/Cloud Architect working with many Opensource and cross industry projects which leverage the ethos of initiatives with similar goals to tohatoha such as the Openstack Foundation, OSI and IETF.

Understanding people organizations and their challenges with how to implement, support and enrich these ecosystems are some of the fundamental parts of my daily life. I would like to share that experience with Tohatoha.

 

 

Brenda Wallace

White woman with partially cut in brown hair and glasses. Aged 25-25.

Brenda Wallace. Provided by Brenda Wallace.

I am a technologist, open source contributor, he tangata-tiriti and gardener. I live in Wellington and work for the NZ government.

Previously I’ve worked at Rabid Tech, Weta Digital, Catalyst IT and Mighty River Power.

My current interest in Tohatoha (and creative commons worldwide) is in how to respect and honour Aotearoa’s Tiriti o Waitangi, and Maori kaupapa when we work in the open, and work within the copyright (and other IP) systems we’ve inherited from the British colonial system.

I also volunteer at a school code club, and see how naturally sharing and creating derivative works is for tamariki. In that lies the wisdom on how we can be a culture of thriving intellectual and artistic opportunities.

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