Category: <span>Science</span>

Home / Science
Post

LINZ Data Service

17 September 201317 September 2013

By Josh Wright In June 2011, Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) launched the LINZ Data Service (LDS), a web-based tool which allows users to map and download LINZ data. LDS licences most of its data under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand licence. We sat down and had a chat with Manager Jeremy Palmer...

Post

Ministry for the Environment

22 July 201322 July 2013

By Holly Grover In July 2009, the Ministry for the Environment started to release its datasets under a Creative Commons Attribution licence, becoming one of the first New Zealand government agencies to do so. The process started in 2007, when  MfE found themselves with a range of expiring license agreements for the distribution of some...

Post

Public Lecture: 'Constructing a Technological Commons'

13 June 201313 June 2013

In this public lecture, Professor Peter Lee from UC Davis will discuss ways to enhance access to inventions produced or funded by public institutions, producing what he calls a “technological commons.” Hosted by Victoria University of Wellington’s Faculty of Law and the Royal Society of New Zealand, the lecture will “challenge the traditional, market-based nature of...

Wikihouse NZ
Post

Wikihouse NZ

28 May 201328 May 2013

WikiHouse is an ambitious global open hardware project that aims to “allow anyone to design, download and ‘print’ CNC-milled houses and components, which can be assembled with minimal formal skill or training.” New Zealand’s WikiHouse Lab was formed by Martin Luff and Danny Squires, who discovered the idea after the second Canterbury earthquake in February 2011....

The Tasman Declaration on Open Research
Post

The Tasman Declaration on Open Research

15 April 201315 April 2013

In February of this year, Creative Commons Aotearoa NZ gave its support to an exciting new initiative: The NZAU Open Research conference. Over two days, the conference discussed the possibilities–and practicalities–of opening up Australasian research, including the use of open licensing to enable research to be shared and reused beyond the (mostly) closed academic system....

Post

GNS and GeoNet

28 January 201328 January 2013

In March 2001, GNS Science, in partnership with the Earthquake Commission (EQC), launched GeoNet, a website providing real-time information on a range of geological hazards, including tsunami, volcanic activity and earthquakes. Since 2009, all GeoNet’s data has been made available under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 New Zealand licence. The idea for GeoNet came in...

NZ AU Open Research Conference
Post

NZ AU Open Research Conference

17 January 201317 January 2013

On 6 & 7 February 2013, the University of Auckland is hosting the NZ AU Open Research conference, with support from Creative Commons Aotearoa New Zealand. Researchers, academics, students and members of the public will discuss  the benefits of openness in academic research, as well as the institutional, legal and social barriers to implementing open...

PrOActive about Open Access
Post

PrOActive about Open Access

22 October 201222 October 2012

Partnering with the Royal Society of New Zealand in the publication of the Society’s eight journals, Taylor & Francis’ goal is to maximize access to and discoverability of the quality research published within the journals. We have a dedicated publishing office in Melbourne, supporting our ANZ-based editors, society officers, libraries and authors on local time....

Open Access — A Challenge
Post

Open Access — A Challenge

22 October 201222 October 2012

Dr Siouxsie Wiles A few days ago I was asked what my role is in science. It’s a question I’ve been asking myself a lot lately*. So, who am I and what is my role? I am a publicly funded scientist with a passion for nasty microbes and things that glow in the dark. I...

Open Access and the Role of Universities in Society
Post

Open Access and the Role of Universities in Society

22 October 201222 October 2012

David Nichols Universities have long been accused of operating in an ivory tower, separate from the rest of society. One area where this characterisation is fairly accurate is in the accessibility of university research works. The current system of scholarly communication places most articles from most authors behind a ‘paywall’ at a publisher’s website. How...